Student Loans

Burger King Student Loans – Student Loan Debt Isn't Hopeless. Here's How I Pay Down $125K In 5 Years In A Way You Can Repeat

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Burger King Student Loans – Review

This isn’t some a quick fix that will leave you debt-free tomorrow, it’s an accelerated strategy that will make paying off your student loan debts an attainable, realistic goal — and one that you can live with.

Student loan debt is real. A lot of us can’t pay it off today, but we can pay it down. Today I introduce you to my channel, where you’ll be able to see how I’m paying down my $125,000 in student loan debt — and how you can too, whatever the amount is.

Let me know your student loan debt story. Email payitdownmike@gmail.com or leave a comment below.

#StudentLoanDebt #PayingOffStudentLoanDebt

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  1. Dave Schoeffler
    July 29, 2021 at 6:10 pm

    The beard brought me here…

  2. Clever Girl Organizing
    July 29, 2021 at 6:10 pm

    My student loan debt story is an older one, because I am older. Graduated with an MBA 25 years ago with 60k in debt (probably about $100k in today's dollars), was making $35,000 a year, living in Manhattan, spending my $1600 a month net pay on with $800 a month in student loan payments and $700 a month in rent/utilities/transportation for an apartment with 2 other people, leaving $100 a month for the rest of my life. I paid off all my student debt in time (8 years post MBA was the limit, as the undergrad 10-year clock started before grad school). I obviously benefited from an increasing income over time, but of course racked up some credit card debt and some other debt along the way, too, Wheee!

    Every time I got a raise or a bonus, I put half the net pay to my student loans or credit card (whichever had the highest interest rate at the time — sometimes it was the CC's but sometimes I could balance-hop to a new no-interest card). By the time I was 8 years out of grad school, I was living in Boston and making more like $75k, but my expenses on the loans and living costs were about the same (and add a car lease into the mix). Some loans were smaller and paid off sooner, but I kept that payment amount and applied it to other loans to pay them off faster, and applied the surplus to my other debt. I always kept my spending style as if I was living on $500 net a month, regardless of how much came in. I made a lot of tough choices through the years (Lipton noodle meals with tunafish for dinner, and styling by Supercuts days are in the past, thankfully!) but I also learned how to be very creative with what I had.

    By 2001, I'd paid off my loans and debt, and then kept snowballing that money into a savings account to go towards a downpayment on a condo, which I was able to purchase with 10% down at the end of 2002. PS — was still single through these years.

    I've also never carried a credit card balance again since 2001. (I pay at the end of each month so we can get loyalty points). I was also very lucky that, when I got married in 2008, my husband also came into the marriage with zero debt. We're very fortunate, but we also have a shared philosophy to live well below our means.

  3. kyla4jc
    July 29, 2021 at 6:10 pm

    The debt payoff stuff is awesome, but I'm here for the cute baby and frankly, there was just not enough of her. 😉

  4. Juan Cero Baseball
    July 29, 2021 at 6:10 pm

    Flex on em 💪🏻

  5. Mike Carraggi
    July 29, 2021 at 6:10 pm

    Hey everyone, thanks for watching. Listen – this isn't some goofy strategy (well it might be goofy) but the way I'm doing this is very real and very repeatable. I'm going to go into more detail in my next video; this is just an introduction. Do you have student loan debt? Have you overcome it? Share your story below!