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Can You Go To Jail For Not Paying Student Loans – Can't Pay Your Debt? Go to Jail!

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Can You Go To Jail For Not Paying Student Loans – 7 Tips

www.cambridge-credit.org — Too many of us, going to jail because we can’t pay our bills sounds harsh. However, ‘Debtors Prisons’ were a stark reality throughout most of history. Thankfully, the law has caught up to the times and we no longer send people to prison because they cannot afford to pay a bill… or do we? Payday lenders and others have found a way to not only imprison people, but also to have the court system act as a collection unit. How so? We’ll tell you.

Transcription:
To many of us, going to jail because we can’t pay our bills sounds harsh. However, ‘Debtors Prisons’ were a stark reality throughout most of history. Thankfully, the law has caught up to the times and we no longer send people to prison because they cannot afford to pay a bill… or do we? Disturbing new reports indicate that debt collectors in Missouri, Illinois, Alabama and a few other states are using a legal loophole to justify jailing poor citizens who legitimately cannot pay their debts. Now, jailing someone for unpaid debts is Unconstitutional, at least since the early 1970’s. But, payday lenders and others have found a way to not only imprison people, but also to have the court system act as a collection unit. How so? We’ll tell you.
Debtors prisons were borne out of financial necessity, or at least that’s what creditors believed. Prior to the 19th century, these institutions were a far too common way to deal with unpaid obligations. Just like it sounds, people who were unable to pay their debts were imprisoned until they had the means to do so. Ironically, debtors were charged room and board, and were allowed no way of generating the necessary revenue to repay their debts. Given the impracticality of not allowing prisoners to work off their debt, prisons utilized inmates for cheap labor. Many friends and family members took it upon themselves to raise the cash needed to free their loved ones, perhaps the most famous among them being Charles Dickens, who worked dilligently to repay the debts of his father. It is no coincidence that the dark and disturbing nature of Dickens’ experiences comes through vividly in his novels, as he witnessed the deplorable treatment his father suffered in Marshalsea, a debtor’s prison in England.
Fast forward to 2012, and there are few civilized human beings among us who would condone the imprisonment of the poor and destitute… save for of course for payday lenders. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch detailed how lenders are exploiting the judicial system. According to the newspaper, creditors file, and receive, a judgment in civil court after an obligation goes unpaid. The debtor is summoned to court for an “examination” to review their financial situation, in hopes of coming to an equitable resolution. If the debtor fails to appear, which is often the case, the creditor can request a “body attachment, which in reality is an arrest warrant. Once the warrant has been issued, the police will enforce the action given the opportunity. If the debtor is jailed, they will have to wait for a court hearing, or post bond. Here’s the rub – judges often set the debtor’s bond at the amount of the debt and turn the bond money over to the creditor. So, not only are creditors circumventing the law, but they’re turning the judicial system into an extension of their collection efforts.
Although the U.S. abolished debtors’ prisons in the 1830s, more than a third of U.S. states allow the police to imprison debtors for nonpayment due to the aforementioned clause. These bills include health care, credit cards, and even auto loans. Imagine going to jail for your Discover bill – crazy! Even worse, some states also apply “poverty penalties,” including late fees, payment plan fees, and interest when people are unable to pay all their debts at once, according to a report by the New York University’s Brennan Center for Justice. For instance, Alabama charges a 30% collection fee, while Florida allows private debt collectors to add a 40% surcharge on the original debt. Some Florida counties also use so-called collection courts, where debtors can be jailed but have no right to a public defender.
Obviously, this practice does not sit well with legislators, especially since many of the victims are living on funds that are legally protected from being used for outstanding debt judgments, such as Social Security, unemployment insurance, or veterans’ benefits. The situation prompted Illinois legislators to pass the Debtors’ Rights Act of 2012, which requires two “pay or appear” court notices to be sent to debtors before an arrest can be made. It also prevents creditors from calling for multiple examinations, a common practice, unless the debtor’s financial state has significantly changed. The bottom line is that whenever you receive a notice to appear in court, make sure you do so. Now I’m not a lawyer, so please don’t depend on me for legal advice. You need to do your homework on this issue.

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22 Comments
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22 Comments

  1. Joffrey
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    I lost my money in crypto, I have currently a negative account balance on my brokerage account. What is going to happen? Will I have to pay it off?

  2. Gary R
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    Enough to make one go postal

  3. Phil S
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    Don't pay them. They can't lock you up forever. Matter of fact they come to your house with a warrant,shot them. They are Tresspassing. Now is it worth all that. Ok. Leave folks alone. Piss on paying fines.

  4. Justin A. Gamache, B.S., M.Ed.
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    I don't need a social security or id anyway and have no clue what the fuck their talking about… have a nice life.

  5. Justin A. Gamache, B.S., M.Ed.
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    oh yeah, go to jail because you can't pay your debts… STOP THE PREDATORY LENDING AND THEIR WON'T BE ANY DEBTS… TELL CREDITORS TO FUCK OFF! ALSO NOTE, THERE WILL BE NO MEAN ATTENDING COURT…

  6. Alma Smith
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    The destruction of the western empire. Once you start treating your citizens this way, you are on a slippery slope. Unlike Rome's slopey oil , the western slope is covered in grease.

  7. Funda Akova
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    If you want to borrow a few cash over the net, you need to check OneLendOpp . co m .

  8. rosana thaqi
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    You men want to move here in case you're trying to take a loan online: O n eLe nd O pp. Com (dispose of gaps), NO BS, just seat down for 20 min' and the money could be wired for your financial institution.

  9. bahama Boy
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    Y’all believe this shit y’all stupid

  10. Miss Philosophie
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    Wouldn't chapter 11 bankruptcy resolve this?

  11. The Jobless Coder
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    And people I'm breaking the law. Can't break a law that already broken in a system that's broken

  12. vacationboyvideos
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    If i max out my credit cards and skip town(move to asia) what then?

  13. SAMURAI K9S
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    People may not go to jail for bills. They go to jail for fines. Not much difference.

  14. Rizwan Baig
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    Fucking currupt un equal justice

  15. Jerome Garcia
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    Yeah but in child support the individual corporation not attached to the state uses contracts that violate due process of law, it also doesn't disclose the facts of the agreements, thus legally void as the contract/agreement is under duress,
    Add the fact child support operates under the social security act which is the executive branch of government is violating the people and rights protected by the constitution because child support is holding court and making court orders which is a judicial duty under the judicial branch of government,
    This is fraud and subject to federal district court…. strongly recommend if you are thrown in jail for child support you sue the judge in the individual capacity and all state actors involved under 42 USC 1983…

  16. CARS ELITE
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    So stop giving credit cards and start producing commercials that say you can’t afford credit cards don’t apply and stop going to to colleges and handing out credit cards like candy bc this country was great when I was little but now we have scum all over the system that’s broken scum bag banks

  17. lasalleman
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    People are NOT being jailed for civil debts. They are being jailed for contempt for not showing up at a required court appearance.

  18. Thanks A lot
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    The land of the free… so they say.

  19. viswananuth shamsundar
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    Stop lying prick

  20. Octavius Del Monte
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    But our monetary system is based on increasing debt, so eventually a greater % will have to go into debt. Result: castes, legalized enslaved populations.

  21. dimeolas777
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    Federal law prohibits this, maybe you should speak to the attorneys I know.

  22. tecknos africa
    July 24, 2021 at 3:21 am

    you didn't kill anybody , you don't just have money . money doesn't grow on trees , you're not to be blamed if you are unemployed